Mages & Wizards

Mages are to fantasy what porn actresses are to the movie industry: if they aren’t there, you feel like there’s something missing. Brilliant stuff.

Mages and wizards are powerful characters that bend magic to their own will, and they are usually involved in every fairy tale. Except maybe in Red Riding Hood, and good Lord, that story is lame. In fact, if there was a wizard in that story, he would have called social services: Red Riding Hood’s mom sends his daughter into the forest to visit grandma, who happens to live alone in a poorly protected cottage stalked by wolves. Red Riding Hood’s mom was either a lousy mom or a serial killer planning on getting rid of her family.

“Polymorphing might be painful, click on the image to save the sheep!!”

There are different kind of mages. World of Warcraft makes us believe that mages are just spellcasters who happen to make things explode and transform other people in sheeps (see the image above). For some inexplicable reason, they are really bad businessmen. Otherwise, they would be opening restaurants all over Azeroth, which would prove effective with their ability to create food and drink out of nowhere.

But the concept of mages wasn’t always lied to sheep abuse and miracles in multiplying food and drink. In the beginning, wizards had quite a defined line to construct their personalities: they controlled arcane forces, they wore a hat ending in a peak, and long robes. Mystic and enigmatically, they spent most of their time poking their nose into big dusty books and their social life sucks. Nowadays they are called “nerds”.

“See? Nerds. No doubt.”

This was pretty clear to everyone until Harry Potter got in the way, changing reality and piña coladas as we knew them, probably created as a subversive influence to change the nerdy image we had about magic men (NOTE: Magic men are not men with huge reproductive capabilities).

Harry Potter was a nerd AND a mage, which semantically managed to separate both concepts as different definitions. In a way, it is the same phenomenon that we can observe in politics: they claim to have principles and make politics at the same time, which is an inherent contradiction by itself.

There are many important wizards in our collective imaginary: Tolkien’s Gandalf set an important figure in Lord Of The Rings. Merlin is a milestone in Arthurian Legends. Raistlin Majere in the Dragonlance series. Medivh in World of Warcraft.

But there is a character that brings the iconic essence of magicians back to life: Terry Pratchett’s Rincewind. He is a wiZZard, according to his hat, and believes in pre-emtive karma, as in his karma ensures that bad things will happen to him no matter how brilliant his future might seem. Dramatic and outrageously funny, this is really brilliant stuff.

Advertisements

One Response

  1. […] |ngenius wrote an interesting post today onHere’s a quick excerpt Mages are to fantasy what porn actresses are to the movie industry: if they aren’t there, you feel like there’s something missing. Brilliant stuff. Mages and wizards are powerful characters that bend magic to their own will, and they are usually involved in every fairy tale. Except maybe in Red Riding Hood, and good Lord, that story is lame. In fact, if there was a wizard in that story, he would have called social services: Red Riding Hood’s mom sends his daughter into the forest to visit grandma, who happens to live alone in a poorly protected cottage stalked by wolves. Red Riding Hood’s mom was either a lousy mom or a serial killer planning on getting rid of her family. […]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: